Dominican businesswoman triumphs in Miami, helping women do business

Miami-based Dominican businesswoman Gigi Núñez shares her success story.  After studying medicine for four years, he changed his life and started a business to clean up debris and trash in places affected by natural disasters.  Today, she bills millions and wants to help other women start their businesses.

Miami-based Dominican businesswoman Gigi Núñez shares her success story. After studying medicine for four years, he changed his life and started a business to clean up debris and trash in places affected by natural disasters. Today, she bills millions and wants to help other women start their businesses.

jiglesias@elnuevoherald.com

Gigi Núñez was spotted at a Miami bus stop one day with no money to pay for the ticket to Kendall. She worked 10 hour days and went to the hospital before the start of her shift to see her premature baby, who had spent three months in intensive care.

The Dominican businesswoman made money from less than $40,000 to more than seven figures with her disaster-hit debris and debris removal business Money Team Group LLC, which she shares management with her husband Angelo Torres.

He also has real estate investments and a loan company for emergencies like illness in the Dominican Republic where it is not easy to get this kind of help quickly.

“I don’t like to talk about millions, but we’ve done super well over the last year,” he says, noting that his cleaning company was able to employ 550 people in 2020, when many businesses were faltering due to the pandemic.

Gone are the days when they broke down walls and dreamed of changing their lives. Before he got his start as an entrepreneur, Colombian-born Angelo had the worst jobs owned by an undocumented immigrant. Gigi has also gone through bad times, like when she was 18 she fell into a deep depression that caused her to weigh 270 pounds.

“The food was my comfort, I only ate McDonalds and pizza,” says Núñez, who was inspired to make a change in his life by a video of her baby, who weighs one and a half pounds and was struggling to move around in the crib .

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Miami-based Dominican businesswoman Gigi Núñez shares her success story. After studying medicine for four years, he changed his life and started a business to clean up debris and trash in places affected by natural disasters. Today, she bills millions and wants to help other women start their businesses. Joseph A. Iglesias jiglesias@elnuevoherald.com

Help women entrepreneurs

Currently, their five-year-old son is a strong boy and Núñez is fit, having overcome the fear of anesthesia, undergone bariatric surgery and most importantly, maintain a healthy lifestyle to take care of his businesses and family. .

“The best way to encourage a person is to lead by example,” says Núñez, who created the successful entrepreneurial Mom Platform to help women and mothers enter and thrive in the business world.

The aim is to offer online workshops and face-to-face meetings while also celebrating the achievements of other women, such as an event held at the SLS Lux Brickell Hotel where the image consultant and Coach of transformation María Jacobo, author of the book clad in gloryand TelevisaUnivision’s Primer Impacto Vice President/Executive Producer Yuri Cordero, who presented her book that evening The virtue of the process.

“It’s harder for us women,” Núñez admitted to the El Nuevo Herald of the roles they’re meant to fulfill: professionals, mothers and homemakers.

“You asked me: who will look after your child? And my answer was: ask my husband who is taking care of the child,” he added.

“The hardest thing for someone is to believe in you when you don’t have anything,” says Núñez. “Don’t listen to the negative voices around you.”

Finding funding is very difficult for women entrepreneurs and that is one of the goals Mom, a successful entrepreneur, sets to guide her through the process.

Tips for starting a business in the USA

Núñez had to let go of fears and obstacles to become the business woman she is today. After four years of studying medicine, he left the institute because it was not his calling. He had chosen it to please his father, who completed three majors and valued education.

“I felt like it was my family’s shame, but now I’m telling you it was the best decision I made,” she says, admitting that she probably would have made a good doctor because ” I’m very competitive, but I wouldn’t have been happy.”

Núñez believes he has a simple vision of life: “We’re just passing through here and every minute you spend bitter and resentful is time you’re wasting.”

At the same time, she is grateful for the support of her family, especially her father. “I’m 35 years old and I feel like I’m 20. I talk to my father every day and I have the same respect for him as I did when I was 12,” he admits.

author of e-book, Decalogue of the Entrepreneur Motherthe entrepreneur emphasizes that it is important to take away the fear of failure.

Part of his experience for this: “When you hit rock bottom you have two choices, either you dive to your death or you choose to lean on your misery to be great,” he writes in the book, which the Points explained in detail.

“Clarity of purpose is the linchpin of success,” is her second piece of advice, and she recalls recently finding the list of goals she jotted down when she started her specialty cleaning business and that she reached six months later.

Though he founded it in Miami, it was in Ohio that the doors were first opened to him in a big way. A tornado destroyed the city of Dayton and they went there to work. They stayed in this country for two years, where they found great solidarity. People had lost their homes, were living in hotels, and were still worried about us, Nunez said.

Then the remittances came in and they worked in Kansas City, Kentucky, North Carolina and in Mexico at a Nestlé plant where an explosion took place.

One of the key success factors as an entrepreneur is “respecting the work of others,” emphasizes the entrepreneur.

“The accountant should be the first person you hire,” Núñez continues in the Decalogue, who also emphasizes that once you start making money, it’s important not to change your lifestyle.

“Once they bill a significant amount, many people make serious lifestyle choices. Progress is welcome, but with order and measure,” says the entrepreneur, who believes it is essential to invest in the company and to give employees a share in the success with monetary incentives.

Doing business in pairs is another aspect you can have an opinion on. “All the great ideas we had came from talking in bed. If one has an idea, the other follows,” he says.

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Gigi Núñez advises writing down business goals, hiring an accountant early, and investing some of the money you earn in the company without changing your lifestyle to opulence. Joseph A. Iglesias jiglesias@elnuevoherald.com

The businesswoman admits she has sometimes wondered if she could have achieved the same thing on her own.

“Maybe yes, but it was more fun that way. We both have the same vision, the same goal, the same values. It fits and success comes naturally,” he concludes.

To contact Gigi Núñez: www.iamgiginunez.com and @gigi_nunez on Instagram.

If you know someone whose personal and professional improvement story could be reflected in this series of El Nuevo Herald profiles, please contact smoreno@elnuevoherald.com or gguerra@miamiherald.com.

This story was originally published on Aug 25, 2022 7:00 am

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Sarah Moreno reports on South Florida business, entertainment and trends. He graduated from the University of Havana and Florida International University.

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